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Sales Tax Election

Sales Tax Benefits 

The additional revenues raised by the Public Safety and Community Infrastructure sales tax are already strengthening the Unified Government's financial condition and helping protect against deeper cuts to important programs and services. With new revenue going to support public safety and infrastructure improvements, the pressure on other funds is lessened, preventing deeper budget reductions in other departments. 

The Public Safety and Community Infrastructure Sales Tax is projected to raise  $6-million a year to help protect the KCK Police Department and KCK Fire Department from further budget cuts and generate new funds to pay for street repairs and neighborhood improvements such as curbs and sidewalks.  The tax went into effect July 1, 2010 and is already being used as promised.

Sales tax revenues, combined with federal funds, are being used to help fund 44 firefighter positions, 21 police officers, 6 police cadets and 3 public safety dispatchers.  A share of the dollars are also being used to pay for community infrastructure improvements. 

The chart below details the projected revenues and expenditures in 2010 and 2011 

Public Safety and InfrastructureSales Tax Revenues

2010

2011

REVENUES

   

City Sales Tax

 $1,500,000

   $4,500,000

City Compensating Use Tax

$300,000

$900,000

TOTAL REVENUES

$1,800,000

$5,400,000

EXPENDITURES

   

Program 1 – Police

   

            Sub-total

$634,800

$2,091,626

Program 2 – Fire

   

            Sub-total

$635,000

$1,935,765

Program 3 – Neighborhood Infrastructure

   

            Sub-total

$510,000

$1,130,000

TOTAL EXPENDITURES

$1,779,800

$5,157,391

Ending Balance

$20,200

$262,809

Kansas City, Kansas is experiencing the lowest crime rate in 25 years. The investments in public safety are paying off for everyone in our community. Passage of the Public Safety and Infrastructure Sales Tax is allowing the Unified Government to continue that investment. 

Infrastructure projects which can be funded with the sales tax revenues include: 

  • Curbs and sidewalks
  • Street resurfacing
  • Street repairs
  • Traffic Improvements
  • Americans with Disability Act pedestrian modifications
  • Street lighting
  • Intersection safety
Details about how infrastructure projects will be selected and implemented will  be publicized once the Unified Government Commission sets the policy and process for designating community infrastructure projects to be funded with the sales tax. 

The current sales tax in most of KCK is 8.55%. The majority of that amount (6.3%) is State of Kansas sales tax. Approval of the 3/8-cent KCK Public Safety and Community Infrastructure Sales Tax, combined with the 1% state sales tax increase approved by the Kansas Legislature, makes the sales tax rate 8.925% in most of KCK, or 8.9-cents for each $1 spent. The following graph shows how much the 3/8-cent KCK sales tax increased the amount spent on several common items. Basically, the KCK tax increased the amount paid on a $100 purchase by 38-cents.                       

http://www.wycokck.org/uploadedImages/Government/How

Some shopping areas in KCK have additional taxes, ranging from 1/10th of a cent to one penny. For example, some stores at Village West have a 8.6% sales tax rate, while others have a sales tax totaling 9.1%. At Prescott Plaza and Plaza at the Speedway the rate is 9.5%. Figures from the Kansas and Missouri Departments of Revenue show the KCK sales tax rate remains competitive with surrounding communities. Many cities including Mission, Lenexa, Leawood, Overland Park, Lee's Summit, Independence and Kansas City, Missouri have sales tax rates over 9%. Some shopping areas, such as Zona Rosa and one in Leawood have sales tax rates over 10%. And Kansas City, Missouri adds an extra 2% tax on restaurant and bar tabs.


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